August Fête in the Fish Lots!

 

This year’s August Fête will be held in the Fish Lots…but, where, exactly, are the Fish Lots and where did the name come from?

The English settlers who purchased the west end of the island from Thomas Mayhew formed a Proprietorship that allowed each of them an equal share of house-lot land from Capaum Harbor to Hummock Pond. The remainder of the island was held in common for pasture, hayfields, timber rights, and other purposes. However, the settlers soon realized they would need to turn to the sea, and the larger harbor, to seek their fortunes.

The Fish Lots, created by the Proprietors in 1717, was the second major division of land at the site of the present town—bounded on the east by Quanaty Bank, on the west by Pine Street, and divided east and west by Fair Street. The lots comprised 27 sections—one share for each of the 20 original landholders and one half-share for each of the 14 half-share tradesmen. They have long been called the Fish Lots because their proximity to the harbor made them a place where fisherman dried codfish on wooden racks. Later, these lots became home to mariners, craftsmen, and tradesmen.

Today, there’s no codfish drying occurring in the Fish Lots, but there will be a great party on School Street on Thursday, August 9th. Tickets are available now, get yours online by clicking here or by calling the NPT offices at 508.228.1287. You’ll get a chance to see inside houses in the School Street neighborhood, and learn more about the people who lived in the Fish Lots.