All posts by Marisa Holden

Friday Find: Envision Nantucket, Main Street…

Tomorrow, Saturday April 29th the island will be decorated in daffodils, and Main Street will be full of people in festive yellow attire and antique cars as part of the 2016 Nantucket Chamber of Commerce Daffodil Festival. Nantucket’s annual Daffodil Festival takes place each year the last weekend in April and is the island’s (unofficial) kick-off to spring.

2015 Daffodil Festival NPT Antique Car on Main Street
2015 Daffodil Festival NPT Antique Car on Main Street

Activities along Main Street include: parades, store openings, and the main highlight: The Antique Car Parade. Therefore, today is the perfect opportunity to share a special tour of Main Street found on the “Envision Heritage” YouTube channel, Please take a moment to read the 2015 Ramblings excerpt “Envision Heritage” featured below and to watch this special video to learn more about this important documentation:

“Envision Nantucket was launched by the University of Florida’s  Historic Preservation Program in 2012, as part of the Envision  Heritage  initiative, which explores how new and emerging  technologies can be used to  document, interpret, and manage heritage sites,  landscapes, buildings, and interior spaces.  This program is supported by the Osceola Foundation and the Nantucket Community Preservation Committee. NPT has been a partner, assisting the Preservation Institute: Nantucket with the program on island.

Laser scanning is a highly accurate and efficient means to create a spatial database of an existing site and can be used to generate other work products. This technology greatly reduces the time and increases the accuracy of recording historic landscapes, sites, buildings, and interior spaces. The 3D laser scanner sends out a laser beam that collects data by measuring the distance of the beam to objects in space.  The scanner assigns distances to these objects by calculating the time of flight of the laser in relation to the known speed of light.  Multiple scans are used to collect data from many vantage points, and these scans are then combined into a single virtual 3D model.  From the 3D model, many types of representational products can be created, including: photo-realistic perspectives and orthogonal views (site plans, floor plans, sections, and elevations), line drawings that meet the Historic American Building Survey (HABS) standards, and animated digital walkthroughs of the site.

Visit https://dcp.ufl.edu/historic-preservation/envision-heritage-/initiative to learn more and to view Nantucket products prepared by the University of Florida’s Preservation Institute: Nantucket.”

-2015 Ramblings

“Friday Find”: The Friday Five!

authorbooklgThis week found FIVE events you should all attend! They may not be directly related to preservation and our mission, however we also try our best to connect with the island community by working with other non-profits and participating in community events. One Book One Island (OBOI) is a collaborative project of community partners that seeks to promote reading, literacy, and community by encouraging everyone on Nantucket to read, discuss and reflect upon the same book. Today, we encourage you all to get out there and attend one of the last opportunities to discuss and reflect upon the 2016 book:
The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd.


FRIDAY, MARCH 18


Celebrate Your Family Story Art Project & Story Telling
9AM to 11AM (ongoing)
(for children birth to 5-years old)
Community School, 56 Centre St.

Concert of Spirituals with the Community  
Starting at 6:00PM
Music Center’s Youth and Women’s Choruses
African Meeting House
29 York Street
*off-street parking available at Silver & Pleasant Streets


SATURDAY, MARCH 19


Family Quilting Workshop
10:00AM to Noon
for children 6 and up and their parents
Artists Association, 24 Amelia Dr.
A free workshop, but registration is required.
Please call 508-228-0722.  Class size limit is 30.

Grimke Sisters Presentation by Louise Knight  
4PM
Grimke biographer Louise Knight offers insights into their life
Nantucket Atheneum, 1 India Street.


SUNDAY, MARCH 20


FINALE!
A Charleston Buffet courtesy of Annye’s Whole Food.
Music provided by The Shepcats.
5pm to 7pm
Nantucket Historical Association Whaling Museum
15 Broad St.


We hope to see you at some of the community events. If you didn’t have the opportunity to read the 2016 book there’s always next year! Make sure to check back next January to learn about the 2017 book and events.

Happy Friday!
-Marisa Holden, Marketing and Events Director
m.holden@nantucketpreservation.org

Friday Find: The mysterious locked drawer….

Spring is in the air! Winter is flying by and we’re getting closer and closer to our busiest time of year, summer! Meaning, the NPT office is getting ready for Preservation Month and our annual fundraisers, welcoming back visitors, board and committee members, and getting into spring cleaning mode.

Mel Cheeseman
Mel Cheeseman

In the midst of our annual office clean up we decided for the, “umpteenth” time to try and open a mysteriously locked desk drawer. Yes, this sounds strange, but our drawers all have locks on them and (before I was an NPT employee, over four years ago) one locked shut, we thought, for good! At NPT we like to unlock histories of houses, so we felt it only appropriate to finally unlock this mystery.

The days of wondering what was in this mystifying drawer are now over. Mel, our new Administrative Assistant, decided to take a swing at opening it and surprisingly was successful! No, it wasn’t a special drawer stocked with important documents, keys, or even fun items, but rather one filled with some very random items! Take a look at what we found once the drawers inside was revealed!photo2

Yes, that’s what it looks like the contents were nothing special:

1. One bag of old, stale pretzels
2. One travel size hand sanitizer bottle
3. One NPT custom made logo bracelet
4. One calculator
5. One small bottle of Aveda hand cream
6. One moist towelette
7. One NPT bank stamp

IMG_3042This may not be the most exciting “Friday Find” but the NPT office found it quite exciting to finally know the contents inside the mysterious locked drawer! I hope you enjoy you’re Friday and search those old drawers, or decide to unlock your house history because you never know what you may find.

-Marisa Holden
Marketing and Events Coordinator, NPT
m.holden@nantucketpreservation.org

Friday Find: Packrat to Preservationist

Esther Gordy Edwards
Esther Gordy Edwards

Today, Friday, March 4th is the first Friday of Women’s History Month. In honor of the month long celebration, we are highlighting a very important figure in preservation, musical, and African American history, Esther Gordy Edwards. Her name might not be sound familiar at first, but you have heard of Motown Record Corporation, established by her brother, Berry Gordon. Not only was Motown a successful record company, it produced some of the 60’s greatest hits by famous musicians including: Marvin Gaye, The Temptations, Stevie Wonder, The Supremes and more!

Edwards, along with other members of the Gordon family, played an important role at the company. In 1972 Edwards decided to stay in Detroit to manage the corporate office while the rest of Motown moved to Los Angeles. She understood the importance of preserving and collecting Motown’s early history and retained a large collection of memorabilia as well as the original recording studio. Lucky for us Edwards was a packrat and her love of Motown preserved this important part of American history forever.

Motown Museum
Motown Museum

In 1985 she decided it was time to share these memories and the building where it all started with the rest of the world, and officially opened Motown Museum. Two years later in 1987 the state of Michigan designated Hitsville U.S.A. at 2648 West Grand Boulevard a historic site. Today, we owe it all to Esther Gordy Edwards for preserving the memories and place where some of America’s greatest hits were recorded. Sadly, Edwards passed away in 2011, but she will forever be remembered as preserving the legacy of Motown. To learn more or visit the museum click the following link: http://www.motownmuseum.org/

-Marisa Holden
Marketing and Events Director, NPT
m.holden@nantucketpreservation.org

Friday Find: Academy Awards and Historic Sites!

For this week’s “Friday Find” we found a reason why you may want to watch or re-watch a few of the 2016 Academy Award nominated films. The 88th award show airs this weekend, on Sunday, February 28 at 7pm. Did you know today’s films often feature historic locations? The following films, nominated for a 2016 Academy Award, feature a historic location and/or building: Steve Jobs, Trumbo, Bridge of Spies, Brooklyn, and The Revenant.

2066 Crist Dr, Los Altos, CA
2066 Crist Dr, Los Altos, CA

The film Steve Jobs, which has been nominated for the best actor in a leading role and best actress in a supporting role, shows the childhood home of Steve Jobs –today a designated historic site. The property, located at 2066 Crist Drive in Los Altos, California, is not only where Jobs lived from 7th grade through high school, but also the house’s garage is where the very first Apple computer was designed. The computer was one of 50, which were designed and created by Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak and Ronald Wayne in the late 70’s. At the time they each sold for $500. Little did they know that their design and those 50 computers would lead them to a company that today could soon be worth over a trillion dollars!

Steve Jobs childhood home in Los Altos, CA and garage where the first Apple computer was designed
Steve Jobs home in Los Altos, CA and location of the first designed Apple computer

The house is still in the family, owned by Job’s adopted sister, Patricia Jobs. Since the house has a historic designation any renovations or changes made to the building must first be approved by the town of Los Altos. If you haven’t seen the film but plan to, make sure to look for the shot of this 20th century landmark!

-Marisa Holden, Events and Marketing Director
m.holden@nantucketpreservation.org

Friday Find: Valentines Day Love!

♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

The Nantucket Preservation Trust has many reasons to express love on Saturday, Valentine’s Day! We wouldn’t be here if weren’t for the support of our members, board, event attendees, business sponsors, underwriters, homeowners, and most importantly the historic island Nantucket! We love the historic island and all that encompasses it.

vday for web

Do you share our love for Nantucket’s architectural preservation?  Become a 2016 member to help us protect what we love, historic architecture and most importantly its interiors! Show us your care and join today by clicking HERE!

♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

Friday Find: Time to Nominate!

Nantucket Preservation Trust Awards, Nantucket Yacht Club, NantuThe  2016 Preservation Awards: call for nominations will run now through Friday March 25 at 5:00 PM. The Preservation Awards honor projects, individuals and organizations that have made a positive impact in preserving Nantucket’s historic character. NPT hopes that the awards will continue to encourage proper preservation work, broaden outreach to the building community, and ensure the protection of the island’s historic resources. For nomination forms and further information visit the Preservation Awards webpage, click here.

2015 Preservation Award Recipients
2015 Preservation Award Recipients

The 2016 Preservation Awards program, now in its tenth year, recognizes individuals and organizations for historic preservation related projects, stewardship of island landmarks, sensitive landscape design associated with historic buildings, historical renovations, new construction, and the promotion of traditional building methods. Nominees are reviewed by The Preservation Award committee and then given to the NPT board for final decisions. Award recipients will be notified in late April and announced during Preservation Month in June via the Nantucket Preservation Trust website and advertised in The Inquirer & Mirror. Award recipients are annually honored at the private Preservation Awards Ceremony, which will be held on Thursday, June 23. By recognizing preservation projects and the work of individuals, property owners, design and construction professionals and organizations, the NPT hopes to encourage proper preservation work and broaden outreach to the community.

2015 New Construction Award - 251 Polpis Road, Robert and Martha Lipp
2015 New Construction Award – 251 Polpis Road, Robert and Martha Lipp

We are asking for nominations of an individual or organization that qualifies for one of the following award categories: Architectural Preservation, Landscape, Stewardship, Traditional Building Methods, Historical Renovation and New Construction. All nominations must include nominee’s name, location of project and how it supports preservation on the island.  To download a nomination form click here or for more information call the NPT office at 508-228-1387.

 

Historic Property in Danger!

Easy Street Gallery from the harbor at right, c. 1930s With roofwalk and porch (photo courtesy the Nantucket Historical Association)
Easy Street Gallery from the harbor at right,
with roofwalk and porch, c. 1930 (photo courtesy the Nantucket Historical Association)

The old Easy Street Gallery building at 27 Easy Street will be demolished unless a proposal to move it from its waterfront site is completed in the next few weeks. In December, NPT–concerned about the loss of an important element of Nantucket’s early art colony–reached out to the Land Bank, which allowed us to complete an assessment of the building with timber frame expert Michael Burrey and preservationist Pen Austin. These experts concluded that the structure is a candidate for preservation.

Although left to deteriorate for many years, the Easy Street Gallery building is structurally sound and there are no apparent “red flags” that would hinder a move from the site or its restoration. Surprisingly, the interior contains eighteenth century elements, including paneled walls, doors and timbers—all obviously repurposed from earlier structures in the Nantucket fashion. The central section of the building is of mid-nineteenth century vintage, but attic beams are hand-hewn and this section is timber frame construction, which would make disassembling relatively easy. A north wing was added about 1923 when the building was relocated to this site. The evolution of the building is still evident in late nineteenth and early twentieth century details such as whimsical door surrounds with columns and transoms for ventilation, and a large sliding doorway that reflect its use as a seaside bath house and art gallery.

Hayden’s building along the harbor, c. 1890s (photo courtesy of the Nantucket Historical Association)
Hayden’s building along the harbor, c. 1890s (photo courtesy of the Nantucket Historical Association)

Besides its architectural features, the building also has a very interesting history. It was originally built as a cooper shop, and acquired and enlarged by Charles E. Hayden for use as a heated saltwater bathhouse called the Clean Shore Bathing Rooms. Hayden established his bathhouse on the harbor near South Beach Street (just north of the present -day Nantucket Yacht Club) with bathing rooms and changing rooms on two floors. Hayden’s remained a popular destination for the early tourist trade for many years, but by the 1920s it was no longer in fashion. In 1923, the building was purchased by Florence Lang and relocated to its current location on the Easy Street basin. A nationally-renown art patron, Lang transformed the building into the Easy Street Gallery (consider a predecessor of the Artist Association), which opened in 1924 and remained a driving force of the art colony until her death. The gallery was part of a larger effort by Lang to acquire, transform and save the fish houses, the railroad depot, and other structures along the wharves and at the same time assist artist by providing reasonable rents for studios and craft shops. With the lost of its patron the gallery closed in 1943 – and became a home before being converted for commercial use.

Easy Street Gallery at left, c. 1930 (photo courtesy the Nantucket Historical Association)
Easy Street Gallery at left, c. 1930 (photo courtesy the Nantucket Historical Association)

In recent years historians and preservationists have embraced the importance of the art colony and deemed structures associated with it as community landmarks worthy of preservation. The old Easy Street Gallery is significant for its role in Nantucket’s late nineteenth century tourist industry as well as the emergence of the island’s early twentieth century art colony. In fact, in 2012 Nantucket’s National Historic Landmark status was expanded by the Department of Interior to include the art colony’s role, noting it is not only of local importance, but of significance to the nation.

Unless rescued, the demolition of the building will occur by early spring. Last week the Nantucket Land Bank developed an RFP for interested nonprofit groups to remove the structure. Although NPT has no funds to complete a move or restoration project, we could team up with a private developer who would be willing to take on a renovation project. Although in the eleventh hour, our hope is that the building can be rescued and remain a part of Nantucket’s architectural heritage.

For additional information contact Michael May at the NPT office 508-228-1387 or mmay@nantucketpreservation.org

Friday Find: A “Must” See Film!

Raise+the+Roof+Postcard+7We are thrilled that Esta-Lee Stone, NPT board member and Preservation Month committee chair found the 2016 Preservation Month opening film, Raise the Roof! We would like to thank The Nantucket Atheneum and Congregation Shirat Ha Yam for co-sponsoring this event. The film has been provided by The National Center for Jewish Film, www.jewishfilm.org

The two screenings will take place on the following days and both will conclude with a Q&A session featuring special guests: Rick and Laura Brown and Filmmakers Cary and Yari Wolinsky.

Saturday, June 11 at 6:30 pm
Seating is limited. Reservations required.
Please call NPT at 508-228-1387 to reserve your seats.

Sunday, June 12 at 6:00 pm
Seating is limited. Reservations are not required.

“Artists Rick and Laura Brown are not Jewish and not Polish, and yet they set out to rebuild Gwoździec, one of the magnificent 18th-century wooden synagogues of Poland, the last of which were destroyed by Nazis during World War II. Their vision inspires hundreds of people to join them. Using their hands, old tools and techniques they rediscover Gwoździec’s history, culture, and art.

Raise the Roof follows the Browns and the Handshouse Studio team to Sanok, Poland, as they begin building the new Gwoździec roof. The crew has six weeks to hew, saw, and carve 200 freshly logged trees and assemble the structure. Working against this deadline and despite torrential downpours and exhaustion, the team must create the structure, and disassemble it again for shipping and eventual installation.

To paint the intricate ceiling murals, the Browns face another challenge: the 1914 photographs of Gwoździec are black and white and there is only one, partial color study.  Using that as their Rosetta Stone, the Browns slowly build a library of Gwoździec’s colors.

Armed with pigments and stacks of wooden boards, the team sets up to paint the ceiling mural in what seems to be an art gallery in Rzeszów, Poland.  In fact, this building and those in seven other Polish cities where they will work during the summers of 2011 and 2012, are all former or active masonry synagogues. Each Handshouse-trained painting leader is tasked with creating the mural’s most iconic images and training students to paint thousands of flowers and vines.

Although Rick and Laura Brown chose to rebuild the Gwoździec because it was one of the best documented, the historic material they found was spotty. Many questions about the synagogue were left unanswered:

What sparked this period of profuse and energetic construction and painting?

Why were the Jews of this time willing to break the Second Commandment prohibition against graven images in decorating this building?

And…

What cultural and artistic movements inspired artists to create these resplendent spaces?

Raise the Roof  takes us on this journey of discovery.”

-Synopsis via www.polishsynagogue.com

 

Friday Find: Preservation Easement Incentive….

For the first “Friday Find” post of 2016 we wanted to share with you information that will help encourage more easement contributions.

Preservation EasementsThis “FIND” may give you a new reason to consider placing a preservation easement on your historic property on island. On December 18, 2015 President Obama signed a new tax bill that includes 22 tax breaks. One of the 22 makes permanent the Federal Conservation Tax Deduction, which allows property owners to deduct all or part of the donated value of a historic preservation easement from their taxable Federal income. This enhanced incentive fixes the number of year’s donors can take a deduction from 6 to 16 years. Also, the maximum deduction one can take has increased from 30% of their Annual Gross Income (AGI) in any year to 50%. This enhancement is a great achievement for land conservationists and those in the historic preservation field, and most importantly those looking to place easements on their property. If you are interested in learning more about preservation easements and the NPT easement program please contact our Executive Director, Michael May for more information.

-Marisa Holden, Events and Marketing Director
m.holden@nantucketpreservation.org